Saturday, January 25, 2014

Snowbirds



Snowbird out in the cold (looking out our living room window)
This afternoon I happened to look out the side window in our living room and I saw about a half a dozen snowbirds picking seeds from our crepe myrtle tree.  

Poor little thing is cold and hungry

Today was another cold and windy day with more snow.  Not a whole lot of snow but enough to coat the landscape in a blanket of white.

My tracks out to the bird baths in our backyard yesterday

Earlier Bill and I went to Milton. I needed to get more bananas and some Neosporin for my wounds caused yesterday by my dermatologist taking biopsies.  Bill also need some medicine, Old Man Stuff.  We didn't tarry too long out in the cold and wind.

I'm so glad I didn't have a chance to cut back this crepe myrtle

Yesterday I saw our resident catbird land on our snow covered back deck, looking a bit bedraggled.  Poor thing, it was probably looking for some water and food.  I don't have a heated birdbath but I ordered one from Amazon.com after seeing the sorry state of my avian friend yesterday.

All puffed up to keep warm - that's the blinds at the top of this photo - he was too cold to care that I took his picture


I love our backyard.  My ongoing project is to make it a bird sanctuary/retreat by planting bushes and trees that provide shelter and food for the birds.  It wasn't my intention to have an animal retreat but I also have resident rabbits.  Bill said he saw one yesterday.  I don't know what the poor thing could find for food, the snow is frozen over everything edible.  


The rabbit lives under yonder shed

This is the first year that I've seen snowbirds.  I was very happy to see them feeding off of the seeds of our crepe myrtle tree.  I'm glad I didn't cut that tree back yet like I did the others we have. Next year I won't cut any of them back until the threat of snow and cold is past.  Now I know why the garden center advised me to cut them back in late February.  

Survival

While others do the Polar Dip and 5k runs for various causes, this is my Causes. Providing a backyard habitat for those creatures that were here long before us and will be here long after us.  That makes me feel good.

Cold in Delaware


16 comments:

  1. and you DO have a fabu backyard! we got 1 inch (or snow) today on top of the 14 inches (of snow) we had on tuesday. will this winter EVER end? (shakes fist)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne Marie,
      I'm over this winter already. Enough with the cold winds and snow not to mention all the road salt on my pretty red Subaru Forester.
      Ron

      Delete
  2. I think providing habitat for birds and other wildlife is especially important in a world where development takes precedence over all other concerns. I thought our owls had been chased away when they cut all the trees from the 23-acre wood behind my house about 3 years ago. Happily, they seem to have relocated nearby as I heard them hooting the other night! YAY OWLS! The hawk is still in the area, too, so I guess some animals have adapted to living with humans, as distasteful as that probably is to them. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK, RON!
    Peace <3
    Jay

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jay,
      Seeing those snowbirds feeding off the seeds on my crepe myrtle tree on this cold winter's day gave me such a good feeling. I love creating, building and maintaining a backyard wildlife sanctuary for the birds. They appreciate it too. Each year I strive to make it better than the previous year. This is my mission in life. I'm glad you feel the same way.
      Ron

      Delete
  3. Anonymous7:42 PM

    A friend of nature, is a friend indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,
      I've been mocked and trivialized over the years by some for the time and expense I go to providing a backyard habitate thus positive comments like yours are appreciated.
      Ron

      Delete
  4. Ron:

    I have a friend who spends almost as much per week on bird seed, several varieties for different birds, to stock the 4 feeders in her yard. I used to scoff at the notion until I sat one day and saw the nature show and just how easily I could be hooked on bird watching (it will never happen as I am not into much out door activities). Still I can see why she spends the money, it is a pleasurable experience. Since I live in a condo with no ground to speak of I really don't have the opportunity to contribute food or shelter but my sliding door looks out onto the lake and a considerable expanse of grass so I can see the ducks, geese and sometimes heron's who ply the shoreline looking for whatever herons eat. The ducks are cute, the geese are not when 40 or 50 gather at least 2 times a day to eat and if they eat a pound they will s@@t two, usually on the sidewalks and pathways. We don't like the geese that much. Anyway, if I had half your yard, I would be doing the same.

    Stay warm, looking at the last picture of you standing in the snow gave me chills.

    Jackj

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jack,
      At our house in Pennsylvania, I used to spend a lot of money on birdseed during the winter. Here I don't do the birdseed, no trees for the birds but the birds still come around. I don't want to start the birdseed thing again but I will plant more shrubs and small trees for their natural food.
      That last picture of me? I was very cold and it is still cold here. Brrrr!
      Ron

      Delete
  5. You might try planting one or two small cherry trees. My farm neighbor has a row of about 5 cherry trees, and they are delicious when ripe. But he often gets few to eat himself, because he has to compete with the birds, which also love them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David,
      Great minds think alike! When we lived in Pennsylvania I planted a cherry tree. It was the most popular tree, next to the mulberry tree that I had planted. Just yesterday I was thinking of planting a couple of cherry trees and here you come with this excellent suggestion. This I will do! Another popular plant is a blueberry bush. Those blueberries don't last long either when they're birds around. I may plant some of them too. I have just the spot.

      Ron

      Delete
  6. You are a good man Ron! Wildlife needs more people like you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nadege,
      I love wildlife! I could never be a hunter. Just not in my blood.
      Ron

      Delete
  7. When I lived in the midwest, feeding the birds in winter was one of my favorite past times. The cardinals were my favorite with their brilliant red in contrast to the white of winter. I miss this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dr. Spo,

      I used to have several bird feeders when we lived in Pennsylvania. Only problem the bird feeders were so popular I attracted a permanent hawk residence on the property who fed off of the birds. The birds stopped coming around my bird feeders. I had four chickens. The hawks killed two of the chickens. Always a catch. I opted not to do bird feeders here because we also have hawks.
      But I will go more natural, trying to strike a balance with nature.
      Ron

      Delete
  8. http://mistressmaddie.blogspot.com/2014/01/usual-winter-suspects.html

    another bird post from one of my boyfriends. wait til you see his birdie pix!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anne Marie!
      Ron

      Delete