Wednesday, September 17, 2014

You Can't Take It With You



This Saturday I am attending my 55th high school reunion in Downingtown, Pennsylvania.  I'm going to let go of a few things.  Some memorabilia that I've been holding onto for the last fifty-five or so years.  You know what folks, I can't take this with me when I'm put in the box and placed six feet under.  

So this morning I went on the Facebook page for the Downingtown Historical Society and left a message that if anyone wants my junk high school memorabilia, to stop over at the Downingtown Country Club where we old folk from the Downingtown High School Class of 1959 will be gathering, checking to see who is still alive and if we can still recognize one another, and accept my donation.


Graduation -1959
First in my family to graduate from high school

Interesting finds going through my memorabilia box, my first driver's license.



I think I'll hang on to that memorabilia.  I'll ask to have it put in with me when I'm put on display at the funeral home.  Maybe slip it between my two fingers with a note saying:

"You may need this for wherever your going."

Bon voyage!

15 comments:

  1. good idea about the historical society!

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    1. Anne Marie,
      I'm glad these items won't end up on the sidewalk in the rain in the trash when I die.
      Ron

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  2. Ron,
    You should definitely keep the license, it is a right of passage and a way to get into the bars. That does remind me of what happened to me back in the 60's. Back in the day, getting into a bar was not much of a problem, I was going into bars before I was 21, nobody asking for ID, just walking in like I owned the place. Then (oh dread) the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board decided that the LCB card was the ONLY acceptable form of identification for entrance into a bar, gay straight or in between. Panic ensued on my part as I had just turned 21 and the thought of being home with family on a Friday or Saturday night was just unthinkable. I went first thing Monday to the local State Store (for those not familiar with Pennsylvania's antiquated laws that's where you could purchase liquor in the state controlled monopoly pay your tax here but never on Sunday store) and applied for a card, only to be told it would take 3 to 4 weeks, oh the humanity. By the following Friday my official identification was in the mail, sparing me the humility of being 21 and spending Friday and Saturday home with the family. Thinking back on those times and now being much older and (wiser?) I would be happy to have spent at least some time at home with family. Thank you for keeping your memorabilia and sharing. I didn't keep most of mine but you bring out many of my memories of those bygone days when you share. Here's hoping there will be like minded people as yourself and you get takers for your treasures so that they might live on long past yourself.
    Enjoy your reunion to it's fullest.
    Jack

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    1. Jack,
      I remember those days. I have one of those LCB ID cards . . . . Somewhere.
      Ron

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  3. Great short post today Ron. Love the banner pic and other photos. Boy I guess they didn't worry about counterfeit drivers' licences back then.
    Our hi school graduations were much more humble than yours. We didn't get to wear a mortarboard and gown until university. Probably different now tho. Who knows - maybe kids dress like that after graduating grade school now. Times change.

    Pat

    Pat

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    1. Pat,
      I understand those days they even have the full fledged graduation ceremonies with cap and gown from elementary and middle school. Even those umbiquitious karate classes where everybody graduates with a black belt. like that short post? I'll try to do more.
      Ron

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  4. It took a while to convince my father he can't take it with him, he kept checking for hearses with luggage racks.

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    1. David,
      Very funny!
      Ron

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  5. I am busy divesting myself. Two huge loads to the dump already. What I can't figure out is why my siblings stuck me with so many "family heirlooms" when we cleaned out dad's house. If they didn't want them then, why would they want them when I go? I doubt there will be much for them to divvy up.

    Hope the reunion is fun! Mine have been (the couple I've been to).

    Peace <3
    Jay

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    1. Jay,
      I love going to my class reunions. I know some folks hate them but not me. I like seeing my old classmates again. Only proble m is some of the widows think I'm marriage material.and I've had to fend them off. Should be interesting this year since I am officially marriage, legitimately.
      Ron

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  6. Is Pat convincing you to get rid of it all?

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    1. He's working on me Dr. Spo. This spring when he visits he's already told me his first priority it to help me clean out my "Memory Room." Oh God.

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    2. A deep cleansing indeed ! Soon your place in DE will look like the hoose in Toronto.

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  7. Do you go to these reunions regularly - even every year? If not I suspect there's going to be a hell of a lot of unspoken "My how you've changed!" thoughts going on on Sat - as well as a roll-call of those who've 'departed' earlier than you survivors, or just since the last reunion meeting. Poignant memories, tales and reminiscences all round. (I'm sure it takes some courage to even attend.)

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    1. Ray,
      I go to everyone I can. The 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th (I missed the 35th), 45th and 50th. This one is the 55th. Since so many of us are dying off now they're having an informal one every year. I haven't been attending those because I live too far (2 1/2 hours) away. At least they'r having them in the daytime (12 noon to 3 pm) now so we don't have to drive at night, oldsters that we are.

      Ron

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