Monday, April 01, 2013

My Voice

Remember the first time you heard the sound of your voice?  I do?  I was in 9th grade English class.  Our English teacher, Miss Laird had a tape recorder and had us read snippets of Shakespeare into it.  This was back in the pre-tech age of 1956, when we were all amazed at such technological advances such as tape recorders and transistor radios.  Oh the thrill! 
Me - 1956




Ancient tape recorder circa 1956

So there we were folks, the Miss Laird's ninth grade Downingtown High School class of 1956 reading Shakespeare into one of those ancient reel to reel tape recorders.  We were all mesmerized by this new technological wonder.  That is until we heard the sound of our voices.  

Oh God!  Is THAT what I sound like?  I sounded like a baby version of Bugs Bunny. 



OMG!  I felt like running out of the classroom and hiding in a dark recess somewhere.  No wonder I didn't have any friends.  And here I thought it was because one of my brothers told on me that I liked to play with paper dolls.


By the way, I ONLY did movie star paper dolls.  Even at ten years old my gay gene was set.

But back to MY VOICE on the tape recorder.  My panic was quickly assuaged (look it up in the dictionary, these big word just occasionally pop out in me), when my other class members were similarly disconcerted by the sound of their voices.  I didn't understand why they were so surprised because their voices sound just the same on the tape recorder as they did to me in real life.  Then it dawned on me, this is the way I sound in "reel" life and "real" life.  Get used to it Ron.  But you know what?  I never did.  

So last weekend, when I made several videos of the Bloggerpalooza and I hear my now adult Bugs Bunny voice, I am still a bit taken aback.


I can just imagine the reaction of someone on the other end of the phone line when I ask "Can I come up to your room?"  Uh huh, "Mr. Suav-O" with his Bugs Bunny.  Oh well, it is what it is.





I have a good heart.

The irony is that my Mother named me after the suave, smooth talking old time movie star Ronald Coleman.  Man oh man, imagine what my life would have been like if I sounded like Mr. Coleman.


28 comments:

  1. Ron,

    Always a shock when you hear your voice outside your own head the first time. Think that startled me in more recent time is my accent.

    By the way, your voice didn't match up with your lips in this video. Did you Photo booth?

    And why did you hide Bill's water?

    lar

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    1. Lar,

      I lip synched that video. Got the timing off. Yes, it was Photo Booth. Is it always that way?

      Ron

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  2. You don't sound Bugs-ish to me ....

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    1. Why thank you Bob. I appreciate that. :)

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  3. By the way, I had some Dagwood and Blondie paper dolls when I was a young kid. I don't know whatever happened to them. They'd be considered "vintage" now (much like myself).

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    1. Jon,

      I never saw the Dagwood and Blondie paper dolls. My fascination was with the movie star paper dolls. I wasn't interested in any others. Oh I wish I had those books now. My Mother threw away all my "good stuff" when I went into the Army. All gone now.

      Ron

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  4. Thanks for sharing a talking post, Ron! I feel you are being hard on yourself to compare your voice to Bugs Bunny. We can't all have Ronald Coleman. Don't think many people like the sound of their own voice, I certainly don't!

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    1. Paul,

      I"m used to my voice now but the first time I heard it, I wanted to hide somewhere. I just could not believe I sounded like that. But at least my brother John sounds the same and he's a pastor now who speaks before thousands every Sunday. So maybe I'm not all that bad. :)

      Ron

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  5. "it's a far far better thing that I do than I have ever done..."

    hey, I am damn proud of my philly accent. those people who don't like my voice (or yours) can shove it!

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    1. Anne Marie,

      I'm proud of my Philly accent too. Yo!

      Ron

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  6. Loved the talkie post! Here's a bit of info: On reason your voice sounds so different is that when you speak, you hear most of your voice via bone conduction, complete with all the resonating sinuses, etc. When you record it and play it back, you hear it via the same air waves being compressed and impinging on your ear drum just as others do. And quite frankly, I prefer my voice via bone conduction.

    Cool post!
    Peace <3
    Jay

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    1. Thanks, Jay, for explaining why we don't know what we sound like to others. The first time I heard my recorded voice, my impression was "OMG, I sound so gay!" And it sounds to me like I am talking through my nose. Most of us, me included, I think don't like the sound of our recorded voice. Perhaps, if I heard myself often, I would work on changing the sound. But at age 70 now, the voice is what it is!

      David

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    2. Jay,

      Interesting to know the reason my voice sounds different in my head versus the tape or video. Still, I'm always a bit discombobulated when I hear myself.

      Ron

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    3. David,

      You have a very pleasant voice. I wouldn't change a thing.

      Ron

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  7. The 1st I heard your voice(in one of your videos)you sounded just like those people I knew from Baltimore/Upper Maryland, in my college days. It's a very distinct accent. And this was before I knew you grew up north of Philly too. The Balto. twang is very close(might be identical in fact)to the Southern PA/Philly accent as well. Mark(simple lives)has it too over in H'burg.
    I studied dialects as part of my theater training years ago so I notice stuff like this.
    Nothing wrong with your voice Ron. Flaunt it hon'! 8-)

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    1. slugmama,

      You detected a Baltimore/Upper Maryland accent in my voice? Very interesting. For 2 1/2 years I was stationed at Ft. Meade, Maryland which is located halfway between Baltimore and Washington D.C. Maybe I picked up a bit of the "Baltimore Twang" when I lived in that part of the country. But then I was stationed at Ft. Devens in Massachusetts for six months, didn't pick up any accent during that tenure.

      Mark (simple lives) definitely has a delightful accent which is very pleasant to listen too. If you get Fred to talking his French accent comes out. When I was visiting relatives in the Appalachian Mountains back in 1994 one of them asked me "Are you a Yankee? Ye talk funny!" I thought that was really funny because I could hardly understand him, with his Appalachian/Southern accent. I talk funny? He talked funny!

      Accents are fascinating.

      Ron

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  8. It's a common phenomnena - people don't like what they hear when they hear their voice recorded.

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    1. Dr. Spo,

      You, my dear, sir have a splendid voice. Masculine, whimsical, playful (am I being redundant?) and musical. You are a delight in so many ways. The day I saw your handsome face peering out on "The Cajun's" blog, I knew you were someone special. When you speak, I like (very much) what I hear.

      Ron

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  9. I don't hear Bugs Bunny. I hear a mild accent that I find quite pleasant.
    I always wonder where that voice is coming from when I hear a recording of myself. I'm much more used to the sound from inside my head. The people who love me, though, love what I sound like to them, so it's all good, right?

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    1. Java,

      Thank you very much Java! "Quite pleasant", them's always words I like to hear ascribed to me. And by the way, your voice is very pleasant too. Very soothing. I was so glad to meet you. Now I feel I know you three dimensional instead of the usual two-dimensional blogger world

      Ron

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  10. Randy in NEB.2:49 AM

    Ron, Yeah what Jay said, Very few people like to hear their voice played back through a recorder. I think I still sound like I'm twelve when I hear mine. I like your Philly accent too! I traveled some when in the Air Force and met some people from Philly some of the most coolest people you'd ever talk to, all very friendly. I think I heard one time, Mel Blanc said that Bugs Bunny was suppose to have a combo Brooklyn and Bronx accent. If you heard mine I think I sound like I have a western drawl. I'm trying to learn Spanish so I don't know how that's going to sound like. As always enjoy what ever you got. Randy.

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    1. Randy,

      I am perfectly happy with my voice now as I am with most other physical aspects I have now. However, when I was 14 years old, it did come as quite a shock to hear my voice for the first time, especially at that vulnerable age when we are all so sensitive to being "different."

      Philly people are cool! And friendly. I lived in Philadelphia from 1969 to 1981, some of the best years of my life. Some of my friends urged me to go to New York or San Francisco. Not me, I was perfectly happy in Philly. At that time of my life living in Philly was the best, especially 1980 when the Philadelphia Phillies won their first World Series ever, I was there right in the middle of the celebrations and I loved it!

      I hope I get to meet you next year at the Bloggerpalooza ad her that western drawl of yours. Sounds sexy to me.

      Ron

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    2. "...met some people from Philly some of the most coolest people you'd ever talk to, all very friendly." - damn str8 (or gay)! born and bred philadelphian and damn proud of it! youse gotta problem widdat? (a philly sentence)

      :) would like to meet you next year, randy!

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  11. Strange that I should just have put a comment re Sh's Sonnets on Dr Spo's blog - and then (somewhat belatedly) have turned up this posting of yours.
    Btw: Coleman's observation of the iambus in each line - da DA da DA da DA da DA da DA (the downfall of many lesser speakers) is exemplary.

    Your voice sounds splendid (believe it or not) - not neutral, but with colour and depth. I notice no peculiarities in it that should lead to mocking or ridicule - only by someone looking for a non-existent reason to tease.

    (My own voice sounds - at least to me - unpleasantly adenoidal. But only when I hear it back.)

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    1. Ray,

      You caught me! Yes, I do like to tease. A character trait that I inherited from my father. He was the same way, only with a much meaner streak.

      I used to have a very nasal sounding voice, as did my brother John, but I think we got that under control by speaking louder and clearer.

      Thank you for your kind words on my voice. I would like to think my voice has "color" and not a dull monotone. My good friend Lar has a voice which is almost a whisper, still even at our age one can hardly hear him. I may not have a mellifluous baritone voice but at least I don't have a boring voice.

      Ron

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  12. I have a friend who designed and makes paper dolls as a secondary career. He swears the paper doll convention is often the high point of his year,

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    1. I'm not ashamed to admit I LOVED paper dolls when I was 10 years old. At one time I wanted to be a women's fashion designer. I think that had a lot to do with my pleasure in dressing movie stars via paper dolls.

      Ron

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