Wednesday, January 02, 2019

Downsizing



This new year I have resolved to seriously downsize. To get rid of things I do not need. 

This morning I embarked out to ReStore, a local thrift store for Habitat for Humanity. They take big things. I have big things to get rid of. See below:

Two three feet high speakers (which Bill got from his days working as an electronics technician at the Today Show in New York city)


Three foot high speakers (very heavy) from the Today Show

A three foot by six foot office desk


Oversize office desk, unassembled

Berber carpet remnants removed from our media room 


Berber carpet remnants 

These are the first three items I have chosen to make an exit from our finished basement. 

This morning I left with Bill to drive down to the ReStore facility in Lewes to make arrangements for the pickup.  They don't want them.  "Too big" they said. Thrift stores tend to be choosy these days, especially down here in Lower Slower Delaware with our aging population.  We're either downsizing or dying thus creating a glut of "things" for the thrift stores to be choosey about.  I understand most thrift stores have limited space and the thrift stores have to watch they're not being dumped upon with someone else's trash.  I thought ReStore would take these items though because of their warehouse proportions. I thought wrong. 

Back to the drawing board.

I placed an ad on the NextDoor app this morning offering these items for free. I've taken that route before and been successful.  I now await calls.  Hopefully I'll be successful in removing these items from our homey domicile.





7 comments:

Joel Reisteter said...

Downsizing, "de-cluttering" or whatever word is in vogue these days, always works for me. But I just never get rid of enough, only just a little, and the "one fell swoop" approach would be too much for me to take. Many years I buy more than what I should and I'm back to "square one"
It is our emotional attachments to things that bring out our reluctance to detach ourselves from objects of momentary desire. Somewhere, someplace in time, the emotional drain will unclog and wallah! We've downsized.
Good luck, Ron, with your endeavor.
BTW, cool studio monitors Bill has.

nitewrit said...

Ron,

Yes, something I've learned over the last decade or so. It is hard to give stuff away. Growing up we learned a saying, "Beggars can't be choosers" but today even beggars are too rich and choosy. I used 1-800-Got Junk a few years ago to god rid of a lot. They were very good, but you do have to pay them. Goodwill will still take some things, especially clothes and cars, but man, nobody really wants books and records. The resellers are very fussy and cheap on those items. It isn't worth the effort.


Lar

pat888 said...

Ron - we're all different. But you might find that once you seriously start to clear things out, as you are doing now, you'll want to keep going. There's really a lot of message in those now trendy words "Less Is More". Tho usually applied to modern architecture on the midcentury era coined possibly by Ludwig Mies Van Der Rhoe - it makes a lot of sense regarding our own living spaces and, more immediately, in the way we live. A blog I follow called The Minimalists are putting out their challenging game to clean house.I'm not sure I could do it as I'm not sure I have enough stuff to participate. Day 1 - remove 1 item from your house. Day 2 remove 2 items. By the time you reach, say, Day 20 to remove 20 things - it's probably getting really difficult - for some impossible. But congrats on moving ahead on this. You'll feel better for sure.
Pat

Anonymous said...

I feel you pain. But its liberating to let go of stuff others can better use. I also
spent six months one year eating the pantry and not buying anymore paper towels etc

It felt good to get back to starting new

Also as to Palm sp Visited a friend approaching 75 who winters there. He walks 3.5 miles six days a week with about 70 to a hundred content men in his age bracket. They leave at 8am sharp from the
Mizell Senior Center, then a subset stay for coffee at the Alpine Bakery
or on Saturdays for a full brunch at Spencers.

The group welcomes visitors. If you arise early from your slumbers in Palm Springs it might be worth a drop by. Sunday is their day of rest.

Anonymous said...

I feel you pain. But its liberating to let go of stuff others can better use. I also
spent six months one year eating the pantry and not buying anymore paper towels etc

It felt good to get back to starting new

Also as to Palm sp Visited a friend approaching 75 who winters there. He walks 3.5 miles six days a week with about 70 to a hundred content men in his age bracket. They leave at 8am sharp from the
Mizell Senior Center, then a subset stay for coffee at the Alpine Bakery
or on Saturdays for a full brunch at Spencers.

The group welcomes visitors. If you arise early from your slumbers in Palm Springs it might be worth a drop by. Sunday is their day of rest.

Ron said...

Joel,
We got a thrift store who is going to pick up the studio sized monitors. Viola!
Larry,
I will have to call Got Junk to get rid of the other things I had posted on NextDoor and offered the thrift store. I was trying to avoid paying to get rid of that stuff but I don't have a choice
Pat,
You are an inspiration to me to downsize. Thank you!
Anonymous,
I'll check out your suggestion when we visit Palm Springs next month. Thanks for the tip!
Ron

Ur-spo said...

good for you! Out it all goes! I am surprise Pat hasn't done it for you already .