Monday, July 27, 2015

Bagworms and Rabbits


Now there is a blog title I bet no one has ever posted before.  Hey, anything to get attention.

Lately I've been a bit off track in my daily postings.  Several reasons for my tardiness.  An obsession with online Scrabble games (trying to get my win rate up to at least 50% - not successful - yet).  Another reason is just the amount of time I spend in my backyard trying to maintain this garden oasis in Lower Slower (aka Sussex Country, Delaware).  

Every year I encounter challenges in maintaining and improving by sylvan wonderland.  This year my challenges are:

Japanese beetles
Bagworms
Rabbits

Oh my, oh my.  Several times a day I go out and collect Japanese beetles off of my rose bushes.  They're easy to collect, they just drop into my jar of soapy water and die.  


A Japanese beetle gangbang

I don't like to kill living things but I do make exceptions and Japanese beetles are definitely one of them.  Why I even slip them into their soapy death when they're having sex, which is quite often.



I think the female Japanese beetle must be the slut of the insect world.  I often find her, hind quarters up awaiting penetration by her male counterpart.  Yep, I slip both of them into their soapy demise.

Another pest I found this year are bagworms.  Ever see them?  Disgusting!  We have a whole like of pine trees bordering our property.  Just last week I found that part of them is already infested with these useless insects.  For the first time I went out and brought insecticide to kill the MF's. You can pick them off too like balls off of a Christmas tree. 
They may look like pretty pine cones but they are death to a tree


But believe me, these insidious, destructive insect will kill a tree in no time if left undetected.  I've already lost a wonderful arborvitae tree next to my front door when I discovered them chewing away from their innocuous bags that I thought were miniature pinecones. I had to have the whole tree removed.


I sprayed the line of pine trees yesterday morning in the hot and humid heat but some still survived, witness Bill holding this one in his hand late yesterday.

But folks, the most annoying threat to my Garden of Eden here is, you got it:  

RABBITS!

Every early evening, there they are, munching away on my expensive Peppers' Greenhouse plants.  And bold!  I almost tripped over these two last night while making my final rounds collecting Japanese beetles.




 I'll be quite frank with you folks, I wouldn't mind shooting both of these Easter bunnies. Really, I wouldn't. But I won't. What I do instead is just try and plant plants that they don't like.

These rabbits may look all cute and everything but they are destructive.  I've often said to Bill "Where is the fox when you really need one?" And coincidentally, yesterday as we were traveling up Route One to Milton to make a pit stop at Food Lion I saw a roadkill fox along the side of the road.  So here we go, the rabbits have no natural enemies here in Lower Slower but the foxes have one which is pretty efficient in keeping their population down:  automobiles. 

Each day is a challenge folks, especially in my backyard where there are many living creatures, some uninvited and not welcome, sharing with me. But then there are others like the honey bees and the birds, all welcome.  That's life!



Yeah, well we have tried to set out the Have-a-Heart trap with a carrot lure inside to catch the long eared critters to no avail.  We try folks.

10 comments:

  1. Bunnies are likely out of season, and you probably can't shoot them in the yard. That wouldn't have stopped my Grandfather, there are reasons he ended up the 80 acres i grew up on, a mile from the nearest paved road.

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    1. David,
      I would never shoot an animal. Sometimes I feel ike it when one is as destructive as these rabbits. Now if there was a fox in the neighborhood, I would have no compunction if said fox did "his (or her) thing."
      Ron

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  2. You have rabbits, I have squirrels. Feed the buggers D-Con Rat Poison. I do. It works.

    Peace <3
    Jay

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    Replies
    1. Jay,
      In Pennsylvania we had squirrels. Oh did we ever. That's why I could never have tulips, the squirrels always dug up the tulips, every last one. We also had deer. Thankfully, the deer aren't a problem here . . . . yet.
      Ron

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  3. An interesting post and I like the video documentation. There are lots of Japanese beetles here in Daniel Boone country (they must be tourists), but I've never heard of bagworms.

    Rabbits are adorable, but not when they're devouring your garden. Perhaps rabbit stew will be on the menu in your future??

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    1. Jon,
      I do like rabbits, I read "Watershed Down" years ago and loved it. However, these little "adorable" critters are testing my tolerance for live and let live. They'll have they way though because I don't like to kill animals. Insects? Sure but not animals.
      Ron

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  4. Oh those pesky bunnies.
    Have your tried black pepper? Rabbits smell things before they nibble; pepper keeps them away.

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    1. Good suggestion Dr. Spo! I'll try it.

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  5. Anonymous5:39 PM

    You need some raccoons, coyotes, owls, hawks, and feral cats to help control the bunny population. I think I have also heard that coffee grounds can be effective (perhaps works the same way as pepper does, as Dr. Spo mentions above). I've heard marigolds will repel them (again, odor). A home remedy I once heard of was the "mark your territory" with urine. Apparently only male urine works. That may have been for deer, tho. Stay vigilant against your garden pests, you are fighting the good fight! ~~~ NB

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    Replies
    1. NB,
      I tried the human urine (mine) when we lived in Pennsylvania on my impatience to repeal the deer. It worked but the plants smelled like piss. Not good. Sort of defeating the purpose of planting beautiful flowers for the smell of nature. However, I do have some marigold plants (came up by themselves) and that seems to work. I will plant more next year. Thanks for your suggestions.
      Ron

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