Saturday, July 12, 2014

Ja Vidi



"Ja Vidi"?  What does it mean?  I don't know.  But what I do know is that his song (and video) by Christopher Goze captured my attention this afternoon while I was at my computer. Often, when I'm at my computer I had Pandora radio on as background music to put me in the mood.  Well folks, this music definitely put me "in the mood."

First of all, don't be alarmed by the "Arabs" in the video and all those sharp scimitars.  Relax folks, it's only a video.  I know we're in the age where we're all supposed to be freaked out by anything "Arabic" (end of times don't you know) but the Middle Eastern culture is one of the world's oldest.  The Middle East was civilized several centuries before the Germanic hordes of Europe in the first thousand years after the birth of Christ.  Unfortunately, some of the more extreme religious in the Middle East are stuck in the 10th century and want to go back there by way of creating a modern day caliphate.  Ain't going to happen, especially with Western cultures foothold in the world and drones but one does have to admit they have a culture that should be respected.  After all that's were we have derived our writing and number system from, among many other contributions to civilized culture in this world.  


Me - Halloween - Venture Inn - Philadelphia, PA - 1980


Remember the old "American Bandstand" show that emanated from Philadelphia in the Fifties?  That was my time folks.  I used to rush home from school so I cold catch the show, which broadcast live every day from three to five in the afternoon.  One of my favorite segments of the show was where Dick Clark would gather some of the teens around a piano and play new music which they could then rate.  Almost invariably, the mostly inarticulate teens would begin their review "It's got a good beat."  Hey folks, "Ja Vida" has a good beat.  

So folks, I'm not taking sides in the current world conflict between Muslin religious extremists and the Christian nations but I am saying, take a listen.  Is this music (and video) cool or what?  Sure does beat those that old American Bandstand music. 




By the way, I don't get the symbolism of the upside down umbrellas at the end of the video.  If anyone does, leave a comment an explain please.

And another "by the way", after listening to the old kinescope recording of American Bandstand and the Ja Vidi video - have we come a long way or not folks?  

Viva la vida!


13 comments:

  1. Ron,

    Don't know for sure, but Ja vidi could mean, "Yes, I See" or "Indeed I see". Upside umbrellas catching raindrops is sometimes used as a symbol for compassion.

    Lar

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    1. Lar,
      I think it means the Muslims are taking over the world.
      Ron

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  2. Ron - I just can't help the way I love that whole scene back in Philadelphia. There was such an innocence and newness happening in a very positive way. No attitude - nobody jaded. Am I naive here? It's not nostalgia for me so much as it is kind of refreshing. Altho I don't know why the kids gave Rango such a score - impossible to dance to. But what I love about the music of that time - it was so danceable. I was nuts about the British Invasion and how it progressed. But I found it wasn't so much for dancing anymore - but well constructed music with a lot of innovation. And I like the trance of Buddha Bar Lounge type music - soft beats of the tabla and exotic instruments. Very relaxing. And videos have made music more approachable. One of my favourites of late is by Fun called Some Nights. Really catchy. But I love a lot of vintage American music for - as the kids would say - a good beat and you can dance to it.

    According to symbolism explanations - upside down umbrellas catching raindrops or tears is seen as a sign of compassion as Larry mentioned. Apparently in Hinduism and Buddhism umbrellas or parasols are a sign of wisdom. I am quoting Mary Kate.

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    1. Pat,
      I loved that whole scene when "American Bandstand" was in Philly. Dick Clark ruined "American Bandstand" when he selfishly up and moved the whole franchise out to California. "American Bandstand" lost its sense of uniqueness. I stopped watching it (and Dick Clark) when he moved the show to California.

      On my Pandora radio station they play a lot of Buddha Bar Lounge music with I LOVE! I like the steady, soft beat and the sound of exotic instruments too.

      Something else we have in common.

      Ron

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    2. And for the umbrellas, maybe, a respect for water - they collect the water that everyone else throws away - water is precious in the desert...

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  3. I forgot to mention - super Arab costume you had on!!

    Pat

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    1. Yes, I thought I looked pretty cool in that costume. I rented it from the Philadelphia Costume company. Paid big bucks for it but it was worth it. Very comfortable too!
      Ron

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  4. It's supposed to be a traditional dance that the men do, isn't it? (probably a ritual prelude to prepare them for killing Americans). At any rate, I truly love the video - - it put me in "the mood", too. I've always been fascinated with Arabic culture and music. I used to eat at Middle Eastern restaurants in Los Angeles. Go figure.....it must have something to do with my Hungarian gypsy blood.

    My mother used to occasioally watch American Bandstand when I was a tiny tyke. I remember the show but had no idea it was on for two hours. Wow, two hours of Dick Clark is a rather unnerving thought - - but, nevertheless, they were the good ol' days.

    I'm rambling, as usual, with nothing of interest to say.
    I'm drinking wine and having my usual Hollywoodized dream of Rudolph Valentino, in his synthetic sheik garb, sweeping me across the Sahara.....

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    1. Jon,
      "A ritual prelude to killing Americans"……that was my first thought too! I thought "What kind of scene is this?" But I do like the music. I have that type of music ("yoga" music) on my Pandora station and occasionally a selection comes up like this that I really like. I'm glad you like it too.
      Ironically, the one day I was at American Bandstand, Dick Clark wasn't there. I loved that show and felt a sense of betrayal when Dick Clark sold out and moved the whole show to California. I felt that "American Bandstand" lost all sense of its uniqueness when he did that dastardly act. But, it was all about Dick Clark wasn't it?

      Jon, I hope the day comes when your "Rudolph Valentino" does come by your part of the world and sweep you away. Believe me, nothing is better than a dream like that coming true. It's not too late Jon, it could still happen

      Have a great night!

      Ron

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  5. Ron,
    Music was very interesting. More interesting is the American Bandstand clip. Since we lived so close to Philadelphia (Dick Clark actually lived in my hometown while working in Philly) several of the kids I went to school with, a couple of grades higher than me, were Bandstand regulars. Of course, they really thought they were hot s&&t and most of us thought they were too, after all they were on TV and we just idolized them. TV back then was still a novelty so anyone associated with it was definitely a star. American Bandstand was broadcast from channel 6 WFIL studios at 46th and Market Streets next to the old arena. I agree with you that when Dick moved the show to California it lost it's Philly flavor and that's what made the show what it was to begin with. Bob Horn was the original host of Bandstand from 1952 to 1956 until his drunk driving conviction when Dick Clark took over. I remember hearing about Bob Horn in later years but was a little too young when Bandstand started in 1952..

    Just another bit on history that makes me feel a bit older. However, I CAN remember to that's a good thing.

    Jack

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    1. Jack,
      When I started to watch "American Bandstand", Bob Horn was the host. He came from a gig on the Atlantic City Pier. I vaguely remember he also got into some kind of trouble with an underage teen. Then he just disappeared and Mr. Slick (Dick Clark) took over.

      I remember clearly the hot, August day we (a small contingent of us from Downingtown) arrived at 46th and Market Streets to go into the "studio." There were two lines. One for general admission (which was very long) and one for "special guests", which we were - we were there to promote our town's BiCentennial - I along with several of my other teenage peers had won an essay contest with the subject "Why I Would LIke to Appear on American Bandstand". Our visit was fun and I especially got a thrill actually dancing on the floor. Funny thing, I don't remember anything about who I danced with, I was too busy looking for a few of my "crushes", who I didn't see. It seemed that every body I knew was off that day. But still quite an experience.

      Yes, you CAN remember as I can. Some things you never forget.

      Thanks for your comments Jack. They are always interesting especially with our shared "Philly" history.

      Ron

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  6. Anonymous6:05 AM

    I always wonder why Arabs make all those elaborated plans to kill Americans. Junk food is by far a much more efficient weapon. All the best. Juan.

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    1. Juan,
      You are so right! Left to their own devices, Americans will destroy themselves. But the Arabs (some of them anyway), are still so pissed off that they're stuck in the 10th century and the rest of the world has passed them by into modernity. So what do they do? Strike out with their cruel violence. But the Muslims don' t have the corner on striking out in violence, we Christians have a pretty good track record too for destroying civilizations who don't agree with our myths.
      Ron

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