Monday, January 21, 2013

Thank You Mr. President


No one was more surprised than me when president Obama mentioned "Stonewall" in his inaugural speech.  I have a DVR and I had to rewind and make sure he actually said "Stonewall." 

"We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths -- that all of us are created equal -- is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall..." he said.

"Seneca Falls" - women's rights


"Selma" - black civil rights


"Stonewall" - gay civil rights



Equality March Washington D. C. October 2009

For the first time in the history of presidential inaugural speeches the president of the United States acknowledged and affirmed the existence of my gay brothers and sisters and their role in the American Experience.


Proud LGBT folks at the Equality March in Washington D.C. 2009

Most of the people I know hate president Obama.  To this day I'm not sure why other than they hate the fact that a black man and his family inhabits the White House.  I hate to attribute such crudity and ignorance to those friends and relatives of mine that I care about but I know of no other explanation.  Oh sure, they talk about the "Socialist President" and the "President From Kenya."  I still don't understand the depth of their hatred.  I just can't hate that much.

In my lifetime I can remember when most of the people of this country hated gay people this much and more, even to the extent that once a gay person came out he or she was in danger of losing their life.  I think a lot of this hatred came from ignorance.  Of a fear that "their" way of life would end if they or their family was exposed to gays they would be contaminated.  I don't want to get into too much of the psyche of why people act the way they do but I am so thankful that, in my lifetime, we have a man who is the president of this country who doesn't despise us or just ignore us.  Us being gay people like me. 

"It is now our generation’s task to carry on what those pioneers began. For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law -- for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well."



The Rehoboth contingent at the Equality March Washington D.C. 2009


Thank you president Obama for recognizing me and my gay brothers and sisters as a full and equal Americans.


Me at the Equality March in Washington D. C. 2009 - 30 years after I attended the first Equality March in 1979
  

18 comments:

  1. I read a transcript of the speech this afternoon. It was a fairly decent speech. Unfortunately our country is so polarized now, I fear that nothing can get accomplished by anyone. OK serious moment is over now.

    I could speculate on how things have gotten to this impasse but that probably involves a journey through conspiracy theories, and all manner of wackiness. I can hear you telling me, "Sean, Go put your tinfoil hat back on you whack job!" :-)
    I hope the self-deprecating humor came through OK.

    Have a good night Ron!

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    1. Sean,

      It was a great speech. You don't understand but Obama just set a new marker that expanded the rights now taken for granted by heterosexual Americans to all Americans. I never thought I would hear the president of the United States even say the word "gay" in my lifetime let alone in his inauguration speech. We are now an officially diverse country, not just one of straight, white men.

      Maybe in my lifetime we will get to the day when being different isn't a cause for hate and discrimination.

      Ron

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  2. President Obama has moved the "Great Society" forward today as LBJ did in his time. You are correct that the right ultra-conservatives are afraid that this progress means more diversity and change that those white (WASPs) just can't handle. But the nation as a whole is becoming more diverse and progressive, and these moral truths will prevail. I am happy with little steps of change, but today, President Obama initiated a BIG STEP!

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    1. David,

      You're right David, yesterday President Obama made history by recognizing the LGBT community and their right to the same freedoms and protections that are now taken for granted by the heterosexual community. I do believe that DOMA will be repealed during his second term. The haters are still out there but they no longer have the silent approval of the president of our country.

      Ron

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  3. truly a wonderful day! the h8ers can kiss my fat ass!

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    1. Anne Marie,

      The haters are still out there. The difference now is that they don't have the silent, implicit approval for their hate from the president. Get used to it haters, this is the new reality.

      Ron

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  4. From his mouth to America's ears!

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    1. Bob,

      The conservatives are having a very hard time dealing with the new reality. I have no sympathy for them. Get on the bus or get left behind.

      Ron

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  5. People are afraid of change because they will have to change themselves. Why is it easier to hate instead of loving or being respectful is beyond me. People without an education are easily manipulated and are believing the propaganda shoved down their little brain.

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  6. The UK government (or some of it) is trying to persuade the church (mostly) that same-sex marriages be allowed. I just hope some of Obama's speech rubs off over here. I've never heard such bigoted viewpoints. I think fear has a lot to do with the attitudes, that and ignorance about medical knowledge relating to human beings. A lot of people are still entrenched in old theories and it's about time they faced facts. So much progress has been made that surely people won't take that long to reach enlightenment?

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    1. Valerie,

      I've always been puzzled why some straight people are so afraid of gay people. More so than even terrorists. Are they that unsure of their own sexuality that they're afraid they might become gay themselves? I was born in a straight household and have been exposed to straight people all my life but there is no chance that I would ever turn straight. I am 100% gay and wouldn't want to be any other way.

      Ron

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  7. I was thrilled to hear this. Made my heart go all atwitter.
    Peace <3
    Jay

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    1. I got the same feeling Jay. I felt warm, accepted. Just think, this is what straight people take for granted, that they have equal rights and haven't been discounted as we have been all our lives just because we are gay.

      Ron

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  8. Like everyone else, I was surprised and delighted by our President's acknowledgement of the GLBT community's struggle for equality. It was almost as if he was making a promise to work for us.

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    1. Mark,

      I think he was giving a nudge to the Supreme Court for their upcoming decision on marriage equality.

      Ron

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  9. it takes a long time to change a culture; and it is usually a slow and painful process. Hopefully it is going forward nevertheless.

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    1. Dr. Spo,

      Yes it does take a long time to change a culture. Unfortunately some people never change. The culture only changes when those people die off. I do feel heartened though that progress is being made albeit two steps forward and one step backwards.

      Ron

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