Friday, April 13, 2012

Crop Duster


We live between two farmer's fields.  The reason I chose one acre lot to build our house on five years ago was because the lot did not back up to neighbor's lots.  I didn't want a backyard where every time I worked in my backyard I had to exchanged niceties with my neighbors.  Not that I don't like neighbors, I do, just not in my back yard.  I prefer privacy in my backyard.

However, once or twice a year the privacy and serenity of my backyard is rudely disturbed.  There is always a price to pay.  Nothing is perfect.  However, the price I have to pay is very small.  This morning I paid that price.  For about ten minutes a crop duster plane circle and buzzed over our house this morning in order to drop its poison  insect killer spray on the emerging growth of the soybean crop on one of the fields.

Whenever I hear the roar of that airplane engine memories of one of my previous lives comes to mind.  I think it was 1939, two years before I was born and I was a Polish teenager escaping the blitzkrieg of the Nazi Luftwaffe strafe bombing Polish refugees fleeing Warsaw.  Then again, maybe I am reminded of a movie scene I saw many years ago.  No matter, hearing the roar of that airplane engine so close to my head this early in the morning is still scary.  One thing is for sure, it got my birds upset.

14 comments:

  1. Just proves that nothing is ever perfect.
    But, for a couple of days a year, it must be pretty nice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob,

      I would rather have this once a year crop duster fly over (which really doesn't bother me - my posting was more tongue in cheek) than that herd of deer that we had at our place in Pennsylvania. Back there our back yard was a salad bowl for the deer. This is much better. Not perfect, but way better. :)

      Delete
  2. I wonder who is feeding Bambi and his family now. I would love to live in the country and have goats maybe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jeff,

      There is a new family feeding Bambi. I used to put out apples for them until they started to eat all my shrubbery. Bill misses living in the country terribly.

      Ron

      Delete
  3. Holy crap - - I sure hope that pilot knows what he's doing! If it only happens a few times a year, that isn't too bad to endure. I would much rather put up with a crop duster than with the rotten neighbors I have here in Texas. I would ideally like to live in an isolated castle with a moat and plenty of alligators.
    By the way, the crop dusters around this part of West Texas are exactly the same - - except I doubt if the ones here have pilot licenses.......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jon,

      You and Bill are alike, he too would like a castle with a moat around it. I'll have to introduce both of you to each other. :)
      Ron

      Delete
    2. Holly8:23 PM

      That pilot is Allen Chorman. He knows exactly what he's doing :)

      Delete
    3. Holly,

      Do you know him? I've heard his name before. He does know what he's doing but he does fly very closet to the roof of our house. Always makes me nervous.

      Ron

      Delete
  4. I know what you mean. I, too, have no neighbors on the back yard; just vineyards. But we get tractors spraying against mold, harvesters, and the pruning crews. There's something going on out there every season, but it's never bothersome and it beats having teenagers and parties (there's enough of that on the other side of the house!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Walt,

      At our house in Pennsylvania, we lived on 6.875 acres in the middle of the woods. We cleared some land towards the back where we built our house. All was well until our neighbor next to us died and the new owners subdivided that six acre parcel to two building lots. The people who bought the lot build a McMansion that now overlooked our property. Their property was higher up on the hill. The new neighbors turned out to be very noisy and homophobes. We endured over six years of bad neighbors, which didn't end until I called the police and threatened to have them arrested for hate crimes. I know first hand Bad Neighbors. I don't mind at all the occasional tractor plowing the fields that border our property of the once a year crop duster. Not at all. I am thankful I don't have Bad Neighbors anymore.
      Ron

      Delete
  5. Yuck! Crop dusting sounds toxic as well as dangerous. Count me out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dr. Spo,

      I always feel uneasy every year when our local crop duster "powders" us. So far we haven't suffered any ill side effects. So far.

      Ron

      Delete
  6. Standing with my Father this past weekend on the Beach at sunset he cringed when the F18's made a training run on the port in Morehead City before returning to Cherry Point. After all these years he still recalls those blitzs as a 6year old.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Roger,

      I never experience a blitz like your father but I can imagine that is a memory that will stay with him for his lifetime. I always get nervous when our local crop duster makes his annual fly over. He comes so close to the roof of our house. He's loud too.

      Ron

      Delete